--- created: 2021-05-25 edited: 2022-01-25 tags: created/evergreen/2021/05/25, review, node/evergreen/technique sr-due: 2022-06-05 sr-interval: 152 sr-ease: 290 --- #### [[my TO(DO) and EVER(GREEN) structure]] This structure could be applied to any system, but it works best in [[Obsidian (software)|Obsidian]], or other systems that treats tags the same way. In Obsidian tags can filter backlinks, the graph view, and be used with many plugins. Additionally when used in search queries they surface and filter notes. This makes tags useful as both a classifier of note type, and a way to mark work items: [[Use Obsidian tags as temporal classifiers]] These structures work best when they are accompanied by a [[spaced repetition]] system aid in the upkeep and accuracy of these tags: [[Use spaced repetition to weed your digital garden]] Example of inline tags: [[There is a difference between thinking and creating.md#^oieshi]] #TO/PONDER/IDEA ##### \#TO(DO) **\#TO** tags should be used for specific items, not general tasks like "review notes" or "write this paper." This means they are not a daily todo list, they are a way to specify a task inline to to be done in the future. These tags should be temporary, but they are not scheduled. Think of these less as task you need to complete, and more as post it note to remind you of something you wanted to do. It will also be frivolous to try and clean up all your tags, because acting on many of these tags will often result *in more tags...* This is by design, because the goal isn't about the number of tags, it is about gradually increasing the quality of your notes over time. The [[hierarchy|hierarchical]] structure lets me focus in when I have specific kinds of things I want to do, or look broader when I just have some time to work on my vault. Although, my most common use of this is to just let [[Smart random note (obsidian, plugin)]] choose from any notes tagged with \#TO. Even then the specificity is still valuable as it clarifies what I want to actually do and provides autocompletion. This is an incomplete list, and new categories can be added whenever it feels necessary. - **\#TO** - **\#TO/TEND** tasks relating to [[evergreen notes]] that do not require leaving [[Obsidian (software)|Obsidian]] - **\#TO/TEND/GRAFT** Formalize or conceptualize a connection - **\#TO/TEND/MULCH** For text that isn't related to the concept but could be used elsewhere - **\#TO/TEND/PRUNE** For text that is untrue or irrelevant - **\#TO/TEND/WEED** Fix syntax errors - **\#TO/DO** - **\#TO/DO/REFERENCE** the source is there but unreferenced - **\#TO/DO/FIND** remember source but don't have easy access - **\#TO/WRITE** something specific that needs to be written, not used for need to write or expand an evergreen note - **\#TO/PROGRAM** - **\#TO/EXPLORE** - **\#TO/EXPLORE/READ** - **\#TO/EXPLORE/WATCH** - **\#TO/EXPLORE/RESEARCH** - **\#TO/PONDER** ideas or concepts that require deep thought or time to process - **\#TO/PONDER/ME** - **\#TO/PONDER/SOCIETY** - **\#TO/PONDER/IDEA** ##### \#EVER(GREEN) This is the status field in my notes. The purpose behind this status is to be an intentional classification of how developed the note is. ^[[[Ever(green) structure until 2022-01-14|In the past, I had a much more complicated system]], that tried to combine both classification and what my intentions were. This system still does this, but on a much less granular level.] - **\#EVER/SEED** notes that may only have a couple sentences or a few links. They are speculative insights, that I have either gathered from external resources or found through connections of other notes. They could grow into sprouts within a few weeks, or months, but can accumulate backlinks and resources that will help them grow in time. - **\#EVER/SAPLING** notes that have a body that fleshes out their core concept, but haven't had the chance to develop into something evergreen. %% Usually the things that make these evergreen will happen outside the note like additional backlinks, development of outgoing links, and general use. %% - **\#EVER/GREEN** There are three main aspects that make a note evergreen: Quality of [[understanding]], frequency of use, and level of insight. If a note is strong in any of these areas then I will classify it as evergreen. These first three refer primarily to how developed the note is, but also come with the idea that I do not have any current intention of working on them. ^[This doesn't mean that they can't or won't be worked on. [[Evergreen notes organize knowledge so that it can grow]], but they can only do so much without our direct interaction.] This means that any ideas that I have for them should be marked with \#TO tags. There should be no limit on home many of these notes I have. ^[[[A totally integrated machine should be infinitely scalable]]] - **\#EVER/WEED** notes that have content that I am not happy with, these are filtered out from my publish vault. - **\#EVER/SPROUT** notes that I am unsure of what stage they are at. All new notes come in with this tag, and will sit here until I am confident enough to assign them a stronger classification. There is less pressure to understand what needs to be done and what needs to be connected because these are in my priority que. If the number of the notes with this status is getting overwhelming, that probably means I am hitting the [[There is a limit to how much information you can process at once|limit of how much information you can process at once]] and something is going to get lost. At that point, I need to go through and define relationships and what needs to be worked on. Then I can either add them to my [[incremental writing]] que or wait for [[spaced repetition]] to bring them up again. These statuses are much more focused on what my current intentions are for the note. As the number of notes I have grows, I need a way to prioritize notes in a way that I will actually use. The main downfall of my last system was that it was far to complicated to maintain, and so I wasn't able to actually draw value from it. ##### Use these tags to your advantage The point of these tags is to give you ways to *meaningfully* interact with your notes. Just adding and changing tags is not meaningful, but purposefully classifying and marking your notes is. The goal is that using these tags should reduce the amount [[friction]] you feel when trying to improve your notes. --- **Status**:: #EVER/GREEN *edited January 25, 2022* **Topics**:: [[Obsidian (software)]], [[knowledge management]]