*Evergreen notes* are written and organized to evolve, contribute, and accumulate over time, across projects. This is an unusual way to think about writing notes: [[Most people take only transient notes]]. That’s because these practices aren’t about writing notes; they’re about effectively developing insight: [[“Better note-taking” misses the point; what matters is “better thinking”]]. When done well, these notes can be quite valuable: [[Evergreen note-writing as fundamental unit of knowledge work]]. It’s hard to write notes that are worth developing over time. These principles help: - [[Evergreen notes should be atomic]] - [[Evergreen notes should be concept-oriented]] - [[Evergreen notes should be densely linked]] - [[Prefer associative ontologies to hierarchical taxonomies]] This concept evolves in large part from Niklas Luhmann’s [[Zettelkasten]], which he regards as the independent intellectual partner in writing his 70 books. See [[Similarities and differences between evergreen note-writing and Zettelkasten]] #### Implementing an evergreen note practice See: - [[Write about what you read]] - [[A reading inbox to capture possibly-useful references]] - [[A writing inbox for transient and incomplete notes]] - [[Executable strategy for writing]] --- #### References Ahrens, S. (2017). *How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking – for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers*. - Many students and academic writers think like the early ship owners when it comes to note-taking. They handle their ideas and findings in the way it makes immediate sense: If they read an interesting sentence, they underline it. If they have a comment to make, they write it into the margins. If they have an idea, they write it into their notebook, and if an article seems important enough, they make the effort and write an excerpt. Working like this will leave you with a lot of different notes in many different places. Writing, then, means to rely heavily on your brain to remember where and when these notes were written down. Luhmann, N. (1992). Communicating with Slip Boxes. In A. Kieserling (Ed.), & M. Kuehn (Trans.), *Universität als Milieu: Kleine Schriften* (pp. 53–61). Retrieved from http://luhmann.surge.sh/communicating-with-slip-boxes